An analysis of the new testament of the bible

Readers of the gospel are impressed with certain general characteristics that distinguish it from other writings in the New Testament, one of which is the systematic way in which the contents of the gospel have been arranged. For example, the document as a whole falls into five distinct divisions, with an introductory section preceding the first division and a concluding section following the last. The words "When Jesus had finished saying these things" end each division. This five-fold division of the Gospel of Matthew corresponds in a general way to the divisions found in various parts of the Old Testament.

An analysis of the new testament of the bible

1 Peter was written primarily for the benefit of Christians who were suffering from

Acts concerns the very vital period in Christian history between the resurrection of Jesus and the death of the apostle Paul, the time when Christian ideas and beliefs were being formulated and when the organization of the church into a worldwide movement was being developed.

Only with knowledge of this background can we understand the writing of the Gospels, as well as the other New Testament literature that followed. The book has been called "The Acts of the Apostles," really a misnomer because Acts has very little to say concerning most of the original Twelve Apostles.

Peter's activities are described at some length, and John and Philip are mentioned, but more than half of the book is about Paul and his connection with the Christian movement. Scholars are somewhat divided in their opinions concerning the book's authorship. There can be no question about Luke being the author of parts of the book, but the inclusion of what has been called the "we sections" raises some question about the persons to whom the pronoun "we" refers.

New Testament tries to complement this approach with a translation in which English is used just a little creatively to better convey the sense of the Original. The result, of course, is . Literary analysis involves examining all the parts of a novel, play, short story, or poem—elements such as character, setting, tone, and imagery—and thinking about . Analysis of Christopher J. H. Wright´s Writings on The Old and New Testament This is where Wright brings into view the missiology of the responsibility given to Israel through God’s covenant relationship.

Was someone other than Luke also involved in the reports that are made? While no definite answer can be given to this question, it seems highly probable that Luke was the author of the original book, but the work of editors and redactors was added before the text reached the final form in which we have it today.

The Book of Acts contains twenty-eight chapters. Of these, the first twelve report events between the time of Jesus' last meeting with his disciples and the beginning of Paul's work as a Christian missionary.

The remaining sixteen chapters describe Paul's activities, beginning with his mission to the church at Antioch and ending with an account of his residence in Rome as a prisoner of the Roman government. The events recorded in the first section of the book include such topics as the ascension of Jesus into heaven, the choosing of a disciple to replace Judas, who had betrayed Jesus, the Feast of Pentecost and the so-called gift of tongues, Peter's sermon delivered on that occasion, the arrest of Peter and John in the Temple at Jerusalem, the sin of Ananias and Sapphira, the stoning of Stephen, Philip's meeting with the eunuch and the baptism that followed, the story of Paul's conversion on the road to Damascus, and Peter's visit with Cornelius, the centurion.

A Grammatical Analysis of the Greek New Testament - Logos Bible Software

In addition to giving us some insight concerning the early activities of the Christian community, these accounts are especially valuable in that they tell us about the beliefs that Christians held concerning Jesus prior to the writing of the Gospels.

Paul's letter to the church at Corinth is the earliest written summary of the Christian faith. Paul mentions that he received no direct revelation concerning the facts pertaining to the life of Jesus and their significance for the Christian faith, but he is passing on to the members of that church what has been related to him by others.

From this statement, we can infer that the essential beliefs of the Christian community about Jesus were already formulated and were included in the preaching that took place prior to that time. The first section of the Book of Acts reports several different sermons that give us definite information about these beliefs.

These sermons constitute the kerygma, or the primitive gospel that was proclaimed by early Christians before any written records were made. For example, we are told of Peter's sermon to a group of about one hundred and twenty people, another sermon that he delivered on the day of Pentecost, and a third one that he preached in Jerusalem, standing on Solomon's porch in front of the Temple.

Stephen's sermon at the time of his stoning is reported at considerable length, and we are told of Philip's instruction to the eunuch whom he baptized and again of Peter's discourse with Cornelius and his report to the Christian leaders at Jerusalem.

In the last section of Acts, a number of Paul's sermons are recorded in considerable detail. From these records, it is possible to reconstruct with a fair degree of accuracy the main contents of the kerygma, or earliest preaching of the Christian church.

The story of the stoning of Stephen throws some light on those factors in Paul's experience that led to his conversion on the road to Damascus.

From Chapter 13 to the end of the book, we have a somewhat detailed account of Paul's missionary journeys and his experiences with different churches. In Chapter 15, we have a report concerning the Jerusalem council in which the issue concerning circumcision was discussed. The account that Luke gives with reference to the results of this meeting does not agree in all details with the account of the same meeting given in Paul's Epistle to the Galatians.

Since Paul was a participant in the council and Luke was giving what might be called a secondhand account, the preference must be given to the one in the Galatian letter. Luke was a strong believer in Christian unity, and in this instance, as well as in others that might be mentioned, he was anxious to minimize the differences between conflicting views.

To him, the question had to be settled in a manner that was satisfactory to everyone. The remainder of the Book of Acts describes Paul's visit to Macedonia.

While in the city of Philippi, Paul and his companion, Silas, were thrown into prison. After an earthquake shook the prison, they were released and at Paul's insistence were given a police guard until they were safely out of the city.

Paul's experiences at Athens and at Corinth are related, as is his work at Ephesus, where he stayed for a considerable period of time, probably from two to three years. The occasion for Paul's last visit to the city of Jerusalem was the collection of gifts from the various churches that he wished to give for the relief of poor Christians in that city.

Trouble broke out while he was there, and he was accused of starting a riot in the Temple. Paul spoke at some length in his own defense.

Textual criticism of the New Testament - Wikipedia

Forty men entered into a plot to kill Paul, but a friend warned Paul of the plot, and Paul appealed to a Roman officer for protection. The officer heeded his request, and Paul was given asylum at Caesarea, a seat of the Roman government.

An analysis of the new testament of the bible

In Caesarea, hearings were held before Felix and Agrippa, to each of whom Paul was given an opportunity to speak in his own defense. At his request, he was permitted to go to Rome in order that his case might be tried in Caesar's court.

On the voyage to Rome, he was shipwrecked but eventually did get to Rome, where he was accorded a considerable amount of liberty even though he was still a prisoner.

After a time, he was tried, convicted, and executed.

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Analysis In writing the Book of Acts, Luke traces the expansion of the Christian movement from its earliest beginnings to the time when it reached worldwide proportions. Luke was keenly aware of the way in which Christianity was being attacked by enemies of the movement, and he wanted to present the story of its development in a most favorable light.

BIBLE“The Old Testament and the New” Case Study Solution List of major textual variants in the New Testament Byzantine illuminated manuscript, The New Testament portion of the English translation known as the King James Version was based on the Textus Receptusa Greek text prepared by Erasmus based on a few late medieval Greek manuscripts of the Byzantine text-type 11rK2e2ap47 Among the other types, the Alexandrian text-type is viewed by some as more pure than the Western and Byzantine text-types, however, this view is held by the minority of scholars, and so one of the central tenets in the current practice of New Testament textual criticism is that one should follow the readings of the Alexandrian texts unless those of the other types are clearly superior.

Although it was quite impossible to write a complete history of the movement, he selected those events that he regarded as the more important ones, sufficient to characterize the movement as a whole.A summary of Symbols in 's Bible: The New Testament.

Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Bible: The New Testament and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

The Old Testament (also known as the Jewish Tanakh) is the first 39 books in most Christian Bibles. The name stands for the original promise with God (to the descendants of Abraham in particular) prior to the coming of Jesus Christ in the New Testament (or the new promise).

The New Testament is a collection of writings in which different people set forth their convictions concerning the meaning and significance of the earthly life of Jesus of Nazareth. No one of these writings appeared until some years after Jesus' physical death.

Textual criticism of the New Testament is the analysis of the manuscripts of the New Testament, whose goals include identification of transcription errors, analysis of versions, and attempts to reconstruct the original.. The New Testament has been preserved in more than 5, Greek manuscripts, 10, Latin manuscripts and 9, manuscripts in various other ancient languages including Syriac.

About the New Testament of the Bible; Summary and Analysis; The Pauline Letters; Galatians; 1 and 2 Thessalonians; 1 and 2 Corinthians; Romans; Analysis. In writing the Book of Acts, Luke traces the expansion of the Christian movement from its earliest beginnings to the time when it reached worldwide proportions.

Luke was keenly aware of. About Summarized Bible: Complete Summary of the New Testament Most people have two or more Bibles in their home, and many people can point to two or three chapters and summarize their content (such as Genesis 1 or Psalm 23).

Books of the Bible List Order - Complete New and Old Testament