Ralph waldo emerson essay on friendship summary

His father, pastor of the First Unitarian Church of Boston, chaplain of the Massachusetts Senate, and an editor of Monthly Anthology, a literary review, once described two-year-old son Waldo as "a rather dull scholar. Following William's death from stomach cancer inthe family was left in a state of near-poverty, and Emerson was raised by his mother and Mary Moody Emerson, an aunt whose acute, critical intelligence would have a lifelong influence on him. Through the persistence of these two women, he completed studies at the Boston Public Latin School.

Ralph waldo emerson essay on friendship summary

Emerson believes that the scholar's duties are all comprised in what?

Study as an activity, in whatever form, brings us joy and enhances our thinking, speaking and writing ability adding charm to our personality. Their chief use for delight is in privateness and retiring; for ornament, is in discourse; and for ability, is in the judgment and disposition of business.

Study is always a private activity which people engage in when they are alone or in the privacy of their homes. It helps them in relaxation after a strenuous routine, when the body and mind need to slow down. It sharpens our intellect helping us to judge things soundly.

For expert men can execute, and perhaps judge of particulars, one by one; but the general counsels, and the plots and marshalling of affairs, come best from those that are learned. It enables the learned men, who have studied extensively, to critically examine issues, and arrive at the right conclusion.

Short Summary of “Friendship" by Ralph Waldo Emerson

They can garner data, facts and arguments or against a particular view rationally. Such intelligent analysis of facts improves the soundness and quality of their judgment.

To spend too much time in studies is sloth; to use them too much for ornament, is affectation; to make judgment wholly by their rules, is the humor of a scholar. However, over-indulgence in studies leads to undesirable consequences.

Setting aside long hours in a day to study will make a man indolent. Overuse of the wisdom to analyze ordinary commonplace issues may make the man appear pretentious and vainglorious.

Sticking too much to rules to asses situations and decide on action may invite derision from others. They perfect nature, and are perfected by experience: Studying adds finesse and perfection to human nature. Experiences in life supplements such honing of nature.

Only when they are carefully worked upon and honed, the in-born abilities yield the best benefits to us. Studying is the whetstone that we use to sharpen our abilities. But inferences from study may lead to imprecise and misleading conclusions.

So, experience is very valuable as it supplements studies. Crafty men condemn studies, simple men admire them, and wise men use them; for they teach not their own use; but that is a wisdom without them, and above them, won by observation.

People who are cunning and deceitful have no appreciation for studies as they accomplish their objectives through many crooked ways.

Torah and Thoreau

Simple folks, however, greatly value the role of studies in human life. Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider.

It should also not be to engage in pointless discussion and argumentation. Studying should enable us to weigh facts and analyze them rationally.

Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested; that is, some books are to be read only in parts; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention. Books of varying content and genre are to be made use of differently.

Some may be given a cursory reading, some others can be quickly sifted through. Other important books are to be read slowly and minutely so as to truly fathom the meaning and underlying sense.

Some books also may be read by deputy, and extracts made of them by others; but that would be only in the less important arguments, and the meaner sort of books, else distilled books are like common distilled waters, flashy things.

One can ask an assistant to read a book and prepare a short summary of it. But such practice should be followed for obtaining guidance on matters of lesser importance. There are some books which are, in fact, shortened already. Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man.

Discussing with others about the contents of a book imparts special practical skills to the reader. Writing removes all the residual weaknesses and ignorance from the person and enables him to remember the contents of a book.

And therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit: So, writing helps to memorize facts. If a person is bashful so as not to discuss his reading with others, he will not be able to improve his wit. If he does not read, he will remain a somewhat stupid person.

Histories make men wise; poets witty; the mathematics subtle; natural philosophy deep; moral grave; logic and rhetoric able to contend. Studying history makes a man wiser, studying poetry makes a man wittier: Abeunt studia in mores [Studies pass into and influence manners].Thomas Carlyle (4 December – 5 February ) was a Scottish philosopher, satirical writer, essayist, translator, historian, mathematician, and teacher.

Considered one of the most important social commentators of his time, he presented many lectures during his lifetime with certain acclaim in the Victorian monstermanfilm.com of those conferences resulted in his famous work On Heroes, Hero-Worship. Ralph Waldo Emerson Lectures.

Emerson on Education [This essay was put together after Emerson's death from a number of commencement and similar addresses he had made. To Anonymous, Truth is a Torah virtue, and the author of the article applauds Thoreau's quest for truth.

Evolution is scientific (and probably true). Summary: In this work, Emerson says that when two people meet who think alike, they grow intellectually and spiritually through affection. Friendship teaches us many valuable things in life and through friendship we learn to fully admire and sincerely comment on one another for the accomplishments.

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Ralph waldo emerson essay on friendship summary

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